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If cell is greater than

Excel formula: If cell is greater than
Generic formula 
=IF(A1>30,"Yes","No")
Summary 

To take one action when a cell is greater than a certain value, and another when not, you can use the IF function. In the example shown, the formula in cell F6 is:

=IF(E6>30,"Yes","No")
Explanation 

If you want to do something specific when a cell value is greater than a certain value, you can use the IF function to test the value, and do one thing if the result is TRUE, and (optionally) do another thing if the result of the test is FALSE.

In the example shown, we are using this formula in cell F6.

=IF(E6>30,"Yes","No")

This formula simply tests the value in cell E6 to see if it's greater than 30. If so, the  test returns TRUE, and the IF function returns "Yes" (the value if TRUE).

If the test returns FALSE, the IF function returns "No" (the value if FALSE).

Return nothing if FALSE

You might want to display "Yes" if invoices or overdue and nothing if not. This makes the report cleaner, and easier to read. In that case, simple use an empty string ("") for the value if false:

=IF(E6>30,"Yes","")

IF function example - return empty string

Author 
Dave Bruns

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