Exceljet

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Enter same data in multiple cells

Windows shortcut 
CtrlEnter
Mac shortcut 
Return

With multiple cells selected, this shortcut will enter the same data in all cells in the selection at once. This is a great way to skip a copy & paste step. Cells do not need to be contiguous; use Control (Win) or Command (Mac) to select non-contiguous cells before using Control + Enter.

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